Handbook of Road Ecology

Van der Ree, R., Grilo, C., Smith, D.J., and 2015. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., West Sussex, U.K. 552 pages.

Handbook of Road Ecology offers a comprehensive summary of approximately 30 years of global efforts to quantify the impacts of roads and traffic and implement effective mitigation. As such, it is essential reading for those involved in the planning, design, assessment and construction of new roads; the management and maintenance of existing roads; and the modifying or retrofitting of existing roads and problem locations. This handbook is an accessible resource for both developed and developing countries, including government transportation agencies, government environmental/conservation agencies, NGOs, and road funding and donor organizations.”

Roads and Ecological Infrastructure: Concepts and Applications for Small Animals

Andrews, K.M., Nanjappa, P., and Riley, S.P.D. (ed.). 2015. Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD.

“Roads and Ecological Infrastructure is the first book to focus on reducing conflict between roads and small animals. Highlighting habitat connections and the challenges and solutions from both transportation and ecological perspectives, the volume covers various themes, including animal behavior related to roads and design approaches to mitigate the negative effects of roads on wildlife. The chapter authors—from transportation experts to university researchers—each promote a goal of realistic problem solving. Conceptual and practical, this book will influence the next decade or more of road design in ecologically sensitive areas and should prevent countless unnecessary wildlife fatalities.”

Road Ecology: Science and Solutions

Forman R.T.T., Sperling, D., Bissonette, J.A., Clevenger, A.P., Cutshall, C.D., Dale, V.H., Fahrig, L., France, R.L., Goldmand, C.R., Heanue, K., Jones, J., Swanson, F., Turrentine, T., and Winter, T.C. (ed.). 2003. Island Press, Washington, D.C. 504 pages.

“A central goal of transportation is the delivery of safe and efficient services with minimal environmental impact. In practice, though, human mobility has flourished while nature has suffered. Awareness of the environmental impacts of roads is increasing, yet information remains scarce for those interested in studying, understanding, or minimizing the ecological effects of roads and vehicles.” 

Urban Herpetology.

J. C. Mitchell, R. E. Jung Brown and B. Bartholomew (ed.). 2008. Society of Amphibians and Reptiles. Salt Lake City, UT. 608 pages.

Human impacts on herpetofauna have been pervasive for millennia largely through direct persecution of amphibians and reptiles for food or out of fear and through habitat alteration through agriculture. Only since the start of the industrial age has urbanization caused essentially permanent loss of natural habitats and the subsequent impacts on these animals. Herpetologists in some parts of the world, notably Europe, Russia, Australia, and the United States have actively engaged in research to elucidate the impacts of this human-generated phenomenon. Yet, the pervasiveness and rate of urban sprawl is progressing at such a rapid pace that we have been unable to ameliorate or prevent population extirpations and species declines. This, we believe, is partly a consequence of the lack of recognition of urban herpetology as a fruitful and critical endeavor. Our aim in this book is to show that studies of amphibians and reptiles in urban systems have much to offer scientists, conservation biologists, and land managers. We asked colleagues from countries around the world to submit original research papers or reviews on a wide variety of topics related to urban herpetology to illustrate this perception. The resulting 40 chapters and 13 case studies in this book will, we hope, set the stage for future research and conservation efforts around the world. 

Montreal at the Crossroads: Superhighways, the Turcot & the Environment

P. Gauthier, J. Jaeger and J. Prince. 2009. Montreal, QC. 192 pages. 

City residents the world over are questioning how best to deal with aging infrastructure built for the automobile, during the cheap fuel era. Montreal is no exception. This volume brings together a range of viewpoints that enriches the discussion.

Roads and Ecological Infrastructure: Concepts and Applications for Small Animals

Kimberly M. Andrews, Priya Nanjappa, Seth P.D. Riley

Roads and Ecological Infrastructure is the first book to focus on reducing conflict between roads and small animals. Highlighting habitat connections and the challenges and solutions from both transportation and ecological perspectives, the volume covers various themes, including animal behavior related to roads and design approaches to mitigate the negative effects of roads on wildlife. The chapter authors—from transportation experts to university researchers—each promote a goal of realistic problem solving. Conceptual and practical, this book will influence the next decade or more of road design in ecologically sensitive areas and should prevent countless unnecessary wildlife fatalities.

Assessing and Managing the Ecological Impacts of Paved Roads

Committee on Ecological Impacts of Road Density, Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, Division on Earth and Life Studies, Transportation Research Board, National Research Council

All phases of road development-from construction and use by vehicles to maintenance-affect physical and chemical soil conditions, water flow, and air and water quality, as well as plants and animals. Roads and traffic can alter wildlife habitat, cause vehicle-related mortality, impede animal migration, and disperse nonnative pest species of plants and animals. Integrating environmental considerations into all phases of transportation is an important, evolving process. The increasing awareness of environmental issues has made road development more complex and controversial. Over the past two decades, the Federal Highway Administration and state transportation agencies have increasingly recognized the importance of the effects of transportation on the natural environment. This report provides guidance on ways to reconcile the different goals of road development and environmental conservation. It identifies the ecological effects of roads that can be evaluated in the planning, design, construction, and maintenance of roads and offers several recommendations to help better understand and manage ecological impacts of paved roads.